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Archive for October, 2010

Are You Ready to Write?

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NaNoWriMo (that’s National Novel Writing Month) starts November 1.  If you want to try your hand at a novel, (or at least start a novel, here’s a great chance.  For those over 13 who sign up for the adult program, your assignment, should you choose to accept it, is to write 50,000 words in the month of November.  (That is A LOT of words!)

Anyone under 13, or between 13 and 17 but doesn’t want to commit to writing 50,000 words,  can participate in the Young Writers Program and set your own goal.

No editing allowed, just write, write, write.  It’s lots of fun, and I can promise you’ll up your word output.

Here’s the link for anyone under 13, or anyone 13 to 17 who wants to set their own goal.  http://ywp.nanowrimo.org/

Here’s the link for NaNoWriMo for those over 13 who want to commit to write (or attempt to write) 50,000 words.  http://www.nanowrimo.org/

 

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From their site:

The First Freedom Student Competition is a first-semester national essay and video contest. It offers high-school students an opportunity to compete for $2,500 awards as they examine the history and current-day relevance of religious freedom, and then, by written essay or video production, present their evaluation.  The competition is open to students in the United States and U.S. territories, and to American schools and American home-schooled students worldwide.  We invite 9th – 12th grade students at all levels of academic placement to participate.

The right to religious freedom is set forth in constitutional and international human rights law.  Today’s youth play an important role in upholding and strengthening this liberty; therefore, the First Freedom Student Competition has been developed to:

  • Help high-school students better understand religious freedom – its history and current significance;
  • Encourage high-school students to explore their individual and civic rights to and responsibilities for religious freedom;
  • Engage high-school teachers and students in the study of American history and the First Amendment; and
  • Challenge high-school students to strengthen their analytic writing and media skills.

The online student registration deadline is Monday, November 15, 2010. The postmark deadline for mailing the entry and its accompanying materials is Saturday, November 27, 2010. Winners will be announced on April 13, 2011, Thomas Jefferson’s birthday.

See the details here:  http://www.firstfreedom.org/education/students.html

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logo

NaNoWriMo (that’s National Novel Writing Month) starts November 1.  If you want to try your hand at a novel, (or at least start a novel, here’s a great chance.  For those over 13 who sign up for the adult program, your assignment, should you choose to accept it, is to write 50,000 words in the month of November.  (That is A LOT of words!)

Anyone under 13, or between 13 and 17 but doesn’t want to commit to writing 50,000 words,  can participate in the Young Writers Program and set your own goal.

No editing allowed, just write, write, write.  It’s lots of fun, and I can promise you’ll up your word output.

Here’s the link for anyone under 13, or anyone 13 to 17 who wants to set their own goal.  http://ywp.nanowrimo.org/

Here’s the link for NaNoWriMo for those over 13 who want to commit to write (or attempt to write) 50,000 words.  http://www.nanowrimo.org/

 

Read Full Post »

The Sylvia K. Burack Writing Award is a writing contest for high school students in grades 11 and 12 in the U.S. and Canada. The award is made in memory of Sylvia K. Burack, longtime editor and publisher of The Writer. Burack was known for her dedication to helping writers and editors.

The winning writer will receive:

• $500
• Publication in The Writer magazine and on WriterMag.com
• A one-year subscription to The Writer
• A copy of the Gotham Writers’ Workshop anthology Fiction Gallery

Submission: To enter, submit a previously unpublished 600- to 800-word personal essay in English on the following topic: “Select a work of fiction, poem or play that has influenced you. Discuss the work and explain how it affected you.” No song lyrics. For essay writing tips, visitWriterMag.com.

Eligibility: You must be a student in grade 11 or 12 attending a U.S. or Canadian high school at the time you submit the essay. The winner will be asked to provide proof of enrollment in grade 11 or 12 in a U.S. or Canadian high school. Employees of The Writer, Kalmbach Publishing Co. and Gotham Writers’ Workshop and their families are not eligible to participate.

Entry deadline: March 31, 2011

For more information: http://www.writingclasses.com/ContestPages/Burack.php

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The Fountainhead Essay Contest Information

Eligibility: 11th and 12th Graders

Entry Deadline: April 26, 2011

FIRST PRIZE: $10,000
5 SECOND PRIZES: $2,000
10 THIRD PRIZES: $1,000
45 FINALISTS: $100
175 SEMIFINALISTS: $50

The Fountainhead cover

Topics

Select ONE of the following three topics:

  1. After the Stoddard trial, Dominique Francon marries Peter Keating. Given her love for the integrity of Howard Roark’s buildings and person, why does she do this? What is she seeking from the marriage? How does her action of marrying Peter relate to her deeper convictions and conflicts?
  2. In dynamiting Cortlandt Homes, Howard Roark breaks the law. What is his moral and philosophical argument for the rectitude of his action?
  3. Choose the scene in The Fountainhead that is most meaningful to you. Analyze that scene in terms of the wider themes in the book.

Judging

Essays will be judged on both style and content. Judges will look for writing that is clear, articulate and logically organized. Winning essays must demonstrate an outstanding grasp of the philosophic meaning of The Fountainhead.

Essay submissions are evaluated in a fair and unbiased four-round judging process. Judges are individually selected by the Ayn Rand Institute based on a demonstrated knowledge and understanding of Ayn Rand’s works. To ensure the anonymity of our participants, essay cover sheets are removed after the first round. Winners’ names are unknown to judges until after essays have been ranked and the contest results finalized. The Ayn Rand Institute checks essays with Ithenticate plagiarism detection software.

Rules

  • No application is required. Contest is open to students worldwide.
  • Entrant must be in the 11th or 12th grade.
  • To avoid disqualification, mailed in essays must include a stapled cover sheet with the following information:
    1. your name and address;
    2. your e-mail address (if available);
    3. the name and address of your school;
    4. topic selected (#1, 2 or 3 from list above);
    5. your current grade level; and
    6. (optional) the name of the teacher who assigned the essay, if you are completing it for classroom credit.
  • Essay must be no fewer than 800 and no more than 1,600 words in length and double-spaced.

For more information: http://essaycontest.aynrandnovels.com/TheFountainhead.aspx?theme=blue

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    Claremont Review Contest

    The Claremont Review offers an annual contest for fiction or poetry for young people 13-19.

    There are over $2000 in prizes.  Entries must be postmarked by March 15, 2011.

    Details are available here:  http://www.theclaremontreview.ca/annual_contest.htm

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    The Elizabeth Bishop Prizes
    Offering $45,000 in Scholarships

    Writing & Publishing at Walnut Hill School for the Arts aims to celebrate the freshest, most accomplished examples of imaginative literary craft by young writers. As part of this mission, the editors of The Blue Pencil Online present each year the Elizabeth Bishop Prizes in Verse, Fiction, and Playwriting, offering $45,000 in writing scholarships.

    First, A Little History …

    While a student at Walnut Hill from 1927 to 1930, Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Elizabeth Bishop contributed poems, short fiction, plays, and book reviews to The Blue Pencil, and she served as editor of the magazine during her senior year. In recognition of Bishop’s contributions to the school and to literary history, the Writing & Publishing program has since 2004 invited young writers around the world to submit work to the Elizabeth Bishop Prizes. Thousands of pieces have been considered since the inception of the Prizes—some composed as near as Natick, others as far away as Abu Dhabi. The students of the department, who constitute the panel of judges for the competition, select the winners each year. (Click here for a list of past Bishop Prize winners.)

    About The Prizes

    Each Bishop Prize–winner is awarded a $15,000 scholarship to the Writing & Publishing Program at Walnut Hill School for the Arts. (The Elizabeth Bishop Prize scholarships are contingent upon winners’ application to and acceptance by Walnut Hill’s Admission Committee.) Each winner also receives a copy of Elizabeth Bishop’s Poems, Prose, and Letters, published by The Library of America, a steadfast supporter of the Prizes, and an invitation to read his or her work at our annual spring celebration of the print edition of The Blue Pencil. Prize-winning works are published on The Blue Pencil Online as soon as they are ready to go to press.

    Winners are announced on The Blue Pencil Online and on the Walnut Hill website during the first week of March.

    How The Prizes Work

    The editors consider for The Bishop Prizes every piece of original verse, fiction, and playwriting that has been submitted to the The Blue Pencil Online and has been crafted by writers in the 8th, 9th, 10th, or 11th grade (see “Eligibility Details” below for more information). Each February the editors come together to read, re-read, discuss, and deliberate over the pieces that have been accepted for publication in the past year in order to select what they consider to be the best work in each genre.

    The deadline for entries to each year’s Prizes is February 1 at 12:00 noon EST. The submission manager closes at the deadline and reopens in March to begin accepting pieces eligible for the following year’s Prizes.

    Eligibility Details: Any piece of fiction, verse, or playwriting that (1) has been written by a student who does not attend Walnut Hill School for the Arts and who is an 8th-, 9th-, 10th-, or 11th-grader (or the equivalent in overseas educational systems) in the fall of the current school year, and (2) has been properly submitted to The Blue Pencil Online—via the TBPO submission manager—between the March opening and February deadline will be considered for the Prizes. A work does not have to have been published in the magazine to be considered, only accepted for publication. A writer may win in only one category. No past winners of The Bishop Prizes are eligible. Walnut Hill reserves the right not to award a Prize in any category.

    See website for more information.

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